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Which flyers can pick up and carry the Dilophosaur?

Dilophosaur (Trading Card) 1993 Topps Jurassic Park Stickers #2

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Oh, and a fuzzy Dilophosaurus?: DO WANT.

Sideshow Collectibles proudly presents the newest addition to our acclaimed Dinosauria series, the Dilophosaurus Maquette. Named for the unique double crest on their heads, these distinctive Jurassic theropods come to life with stunning attention to detail. The Dilophosaurus statue is an extraordinary addition to any dinosaur enthusiasts collection.

This meat-eating dinosaur first walked the Earth during the early Jurassic Period, about 193 million years ago. The two rounded, bony crests on top of its head provide a bright display to other dinosaurs in the wild. Jurassic World visitors beware – if a Dilophosaurus extends its neck frill, then it may be about to spit its gooey venom at you!

Artist's impression of Dilophosaurus.

  • ark tame elite dilophosaurus
  • Dilophosaurus skull, Royal Tyrrell Museum.

    Sideshow Collectibles proudly presents the newest addition to our acclaimed Dinosauria series, the Dilophosaurus Maquette. Named for the unique double crest on their heads, these distinctive Jurassic theropods come to life with stunning attention to detail. The Dilophosaurus statue is an extraordinary addition to any dinosaur enthusiasts collection.

    Far be it from me to leap (hop?) to the defence of Messrs. Crichton and Spielberg, but I always understood that the poor little in the first Jurassic Park film was intended to be a juvenile, hence its small size and (potentially) the shortish skull. Re the venom, I remember seeing several serious discussions over the decades leading up to the book regarding the allegedly weak jaws of , so venom and scavenging were both hypothesized as potential lifestyles that would allow such a ‘weak-jawed’ theropod to feed itself. (Never mind, of course, the complete lack of dental evidence for venom delivery, and the obviously STRONG jaws of modern mammalian ‘scavengers’ such as hyenas…) And I understand that dilophosaurid jaws are no longer considered particularly weakly-muscled anyway; but looked at in context of the times (the book research would have been about 20 years old – an eternity in light of modern paleontology), some of the features of the JP are not unreasonable. I’m as puzzled as anyone else by the neck-frill, of course…