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LEGO Classic Creative Bright Supplement

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At 8 years old, she's never had a set and I refuse to buy pink Legos

I would have LOVED pink legos as a kid. My daughter’s bedroom is an awesome shade of purple. I wouldn’t have picked it myself as a kid (I’m not that brave) but it looks fabulous with her blue and green lava lap and “Dr. Who” posters.

You probably think you’re gonna score some pussy coming out against those horrid pink girl legos, and who knows? You might. But in order to do so, you are denying yourself (and by extension, all other men) the acknowledgement of your own nurturing instincts and you are simultaneously shitting on the very women you hope to score for those exact same instincts!

Pink Legos, Santa Claus & Commodifying the Gospel

  • Pirran

    “You have a few choices, though, Jake. Hit the gym, for one. Put on some muscle. Increase your testosterone. You will literally be more masculine.”

    HRT for men – good choice – he does seem to have the archetypal feminine chin of the testosterone deprived. All that’s missing is the neck-beard and beret. Depressing to find this in the (usually sensible) Telegraph. Sloppy, silly cultural relativism a la mode. Pick a frothy theme (pink, children’s TV, gender gaps) and pompously opine for a few paragraphs to enhance your urban chic.

    He’s taking a fair trashing in the comments section, though, including an eminently sensible response from Elizabeth Fraser:

    “My daughter has pink legos, she has orc legos, she has Harry Potter legos. Yesterday they had a big battle that ended in a party. Your child will play with toys in a way that works for them. It isn’t predicted by the colour of the toy.”

  • Drop the Pink Legos! | Big Think

    “My daughter has pink legos, she has orc legos, she has Harry Potter legos. Yesterday they had a big battle that ended in a party. Your child will play with toys in a way that works for them. It isn’t predicted by the colour of the toy.”

    A tremendous amount of thought went into developing Lego Friends — which is part of the reason it's so disappointing. The company didn't just take a regular Lego set and make the blocks pink. Beginning in 2007, Lego pulled together its top designers and sent out teams to shadow girls as they played. After breaking down what girls really want in a toy, they came up with sets of pink Legos that borrow elements from Disney Princess and American Girl. The team found that what girls were most concerned about was beauty, a term that also encompasses "harmony (a pleasing, everything-in-its-right-place sense of order); friendlier colors; and a high level of detail." Girls hated Lego's iconic minifigure because it's too boxy and they like to have a figure they can identify with. Girls told them, "I want to shrink down and be there." The issue isn't just the look of Lego sets. The researchers found that while boys focus on following the directions and getting the set together, girls like to take breaks throughout the process and start developing stories.